“Young Blood” Transfusions Are Not Ready For Primetime – Yet

“Young Blood” Transfusions Are Not Ready For Primetime – Yet

A young woman donates blood.

(© Aidman/Fotolia)


Keep Reading Keep Reading
James Peyer
James Peyer, Ph.D. was only sixteen when he decided he would dedicate his life to preventing the diseases of aging. In 2016 he founded Apollo Ventures (www.apollo.vc), an early-stage venture capital firm and incubator with a focus on biotech companies that are creating the next generation of medicines: therapeutics to prevent age-related disease and extend healthy lifespan. Before Apollo he was a consultant with McKinsey & Company's biotech and pharma practice, where he specialized in biotech entrepreneurship, drug launches for regenerative medicines, and R&D pipeline analysis. He founded his first company, Genotyp, at age 21 to overhaul hands-on science education in the US. The first biotech company to receive funding through Kickstarter, Genotyp's biotech equipment leasing model and instructor training earned it the approval of the White House and the NIH. James received a BA in biology with special honors from the University of Chicago, where he was a National Merit Scholar. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where he was a National Science Foundation Fellow with a focus on the basic biology of stem cells and improving gene therapies. The author declares no conflict of financial interest with the article written above.
Get our top stories twice a month
Follow us on
How to Live With and Love Bugs with Jessica Ware

Entomologist Jessica Ware is using new technologies to identify insect species in a changing climate. She shares her suggestions for how we can live harmoniously with creeper crawlers everywhere.

Photo by Sonika Agarwal on Unsplash

Jessica Ware is obsessed with bugs.

My guest today is a leading researcher on insects, the president of the Entomological Society of America and a curator at the American Museum of Natural History. Learn more about her here.

You may not think that insects and human health go hand-in-hand, but as Jessica makes clear, they’re closely related. A lot of people care about their health, and the health of other creatures on the planet, and the health of the planet itself, but researchers like Jessica are studying another thing we should be focusing on even more: how these seemingly separate areas are deeply entwined. (This is the theme of an upcoming event hosted by Leaps.org and the Aspen Institute.)

Keep Reading Keep Reading
Matt Fuchs

Matt Fuchs is the editor-in-chief of Leaps.org. He is also a contributing reporter to the Washington Post and has written for the New York Times, Time Magazine, WIRED and the Washington Post Magazine, among other outlets. Follow him on Twitter @fuchswriter.

They received retinal implants to restore their vision. Then the company turned its back on them.

A company called Second Sight made an implant that partially restored vision to people who'd been blind for decades. But when Second Sight pivoted, it stopped servicing its product, leaving many in the dark.

The first thing Jeroen Perk saw after he partially regained his sight nearly a decade ago was the outline of his guide dog Pedro.

“There was a white floor, and the dog was black,” recalls Perk, a 43-year-old investigator for the Dutch customs service. “I was crying. It was a very nice moment.”

Perk was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa as a child and had been blind since early adulthood. He has been able to use the implant placed into his retina in 2013 to help identify street crossings, and even ski and pursue archery. A video posted by the company that designed and manufactured the device indicates he’s a good shot.

Less black-and-white has been the journey Perk and others have been on after they were implanted with the Argus II, a second-generation device created by a Los Angeles-based company called Second Sight Medical Devices.

Keep Reading Keep Reading
Ron Shinkman
Ron Shinkman is a veteran journalist whose work has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine publication Catalyst, California Health Report, Fierce Healthcare, and many other publications. He has been a finalist for the prestigious NIHCM Foundation print journalism award twice in the past five years. Shinkman also served as Los Angeles Bureau Chief for Modern Healthcare and as a staff reporter for the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has an M.A. in English from California State University and a B.A. in English from UCLA.