Waste smothering our oceans is worth billions – here’s what we can do with all that sh$t

In 2015, human poop was valued at $9.5 billion per year, which today would be $11.5 billion. The Ocean Sewage Alliance is uniting experts from key sectors to change how we handle our sewage and, in the process, create all sorts of economic benefits.

Photo by Simon Arthur on Unsplash

There’s hardly a person out there who hasn’t heard of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. That type of pollution is impossible to miss. It stares you in the face from pictures and videos of sea turtles with drinking straws up their noses and acres of plastic swirling in the sea.

It demands you to solve the problem—and it works. The campaign to raise awareness about plastic pollution in the oceans has resulted in new policies, including bans on microplastics in personal care products, technology to clean up the plastic, and even new plastic-like materials that are better for the environment.

But there’s a different type of pollution smothering the ocean as you read this. Unfortunately, this one is almost invisible, but no less damaging. In fact, it’s even more serious than plastic and most people have no idea it even exists. It is literally under our noses, destroying our oceans, lakes, and rivers – and yet we are missing it completely while contributing to it daily. In fact, we exacerbate it multiple times a day—every time we use the bathroom.

It is the way we do our sewage.

Keep Reading Keep Reading
Stephanie Wear
Stephanie Wear is a marine scientist who has spent over two decades working with The Nature Conservancy to protect oceans for the benefit of marine life and the people that love and depend on it. She recently co-founded the Ocean Sewage Alliance and loves to talk sh$t with anyone who will listen.
Get our top stories twice a month
Follow us on