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If New Metal Legs Let You Run 20 Miles/Hour, Would You Amputate Your Own?

If New Metal Legs Let You Run 20 Miles/Hour, Would You Amputate Your Own?

A patient with below-knee AMI amputation walks up the stairs.

(Photo credit: Matthew Orr, STAT News)


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Tyler Clites
Tyler Clites builds human cyborgs. After graduating from Harvard in 2014 with a B.S. in Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering, Tyler earned his PhD in 2018 from the Harvard/MIT program in Health Sciences and Technology. As a postdoc in the Biomechatronics Group (Professor Hugh Herr, MIT Media Lab), his current research focuses on the development of novel techniques for limb amputation surgery, with the goal of improving the neural and mechanical interfaces between persons with amputation and their prosthetic devices. He is pursuing a career in academia, where he hopes to explore applications in which surgical and mechatronic design can be leveraged together in new bionic systems for physical rehabilitation and human augmentation.
New, stronger psychedelics that rewire the brain, with Dr. Doug Drysdale

Today's podcast episode features Dr. Doug Drysdale, CEO of Cybin, a company that is leading innovations in psilocybin, mushrooms that can help people with anxiety and depression.

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A promising development in science in recent years has been the advancement of technologies that take something natural and use technology to optimize it. This episode features a fascinating example: using tech to optimize psychedelic mushrooms.

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Matt Fuchs

Matt Fuchs is the editor-in-chief of Leaps.org and Making Sense of Science. He is also a contributing reporter to the Washington Post and has written for the New York Times, Time Magazine, WIRED and the Washington Post Magazine, among other outlets. Follow him @fuchswriter.

How the body's immune resilience affects our health and lifespan

Immune cells battle an infection.

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Story by Big Think

It is a mystery why humans manifest vast differences in lifespan, health, and susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, a team of international scientists has revealed that the capacity to resist or recover from infections and inflammation (a trait they call “immune resilience”) is one of the major contributors to these differences.

Immune resilience involves controlling inflammation and preserving or rapidly restoring immune activity at any age, explained Weijing He, a study co-author. He and his colleagues discovered that people with the highest level of immune resilience were more likely to live longer, resist infection and recurrence of skin cancer, and survive COVID and sepsis.

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Peter Rogers
Dr. Peter Rogers grew up milking cows and building barns. This provided him the transferable skills necessary for a smooth transition into academic research. Three years of genetics research led to six years of immunology research, which led to a Ph.D. from Auburn University. That led to three and half years of instructional design research at Tufts University School of Medicine. His expertise includes biomedical sciences & technology, social determinants of health, bovine birthing, training & development, and cognitive psychology. He’s taught dozens of university courses, ranging from Principles of Biology to Advanced Medical Immunology. He is currently co-writing a book with his father, George Rogers, called "How to Correctly Hold a Flashlight: A Disagreement in Academic and Agricultural Perspectives."