sickle cell disease

A Cure for Sickle Cell Disease Is Coming. Will Patients Accept It?

Many patients in the African-American community are skeptical of new experimental treatments, thanks to a history of medical exploitation in the 20th century.

(© rocketclips/Adobe)


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Ron Shinkman
Ron Shinkman is a veteran journalist whose work has appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine publication Catalyst, California Health Report, Fierce Healthcare, and many other publications. He has been a finalist for the prestigious NIHCM Foundation print journalism award twice in the past five years. Shinkman also served as Los Angeles Bureau Chief for Modern Healthcare and as a staff reporter for the Los Angeles Business Journal. He has an M.A. in English from California State University and a B.A. in English from UCLA.
This Mom Is On a Mission to End Sickle Cell Disease

Adrienne Shapiro and her daughter Marissa, who is the fifth generation of children in the family to inherit sickle cell disease, pose in 2018 for a selfie after a new medicine Endari transformed their lives.

(Courtesy Adrienne Shapiro)


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Kira Peikoff

Kira Peikoff was the editor-in-chief of Leaps.org from 2017 to 2021. As a journalist, her work has appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, Nautilus, Popular Mechanics, The New York Academy of Sciences, and other outlets. She is also the author of four suspense novels that explore controversial issues arising from scientific innovation: Living Proof, No Time to Die, Die Again Tomorrow, and Mother Knows Best. Peikoff holds a B.A. in Journalism from New York University and an M.S. in Bioethics from Columbia University. She lives in New Jersey with her husband and two young sons. Follow her on Twitter @KiraPeikoff.

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