Arguing About Vaccines Doesn’t Usually Work — But This Might

Arguing About Vaccines Doesn’t Usually Work — But This Might

A doctor cradles a newborn who is sick with measles.

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Junaid Nabi
Junaid Nabi, MD, MPH, is a physician, public health researcher, and a medical journalist. He currently manages several research projects at Brigham Health that include investigating provider- and hospital-level factors associated with racial and ethnic disparities in surgical oncology; evaluating the fiscal impact of consolidating care of complex patients; and, examining systematic factors that lead to opioid over-prescribing patterns after surgery. He has also undertaken research that examined the effect of health disparities that arise from social and political disenfranchisement and the relationship between trauma care and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previously, he was a Fellow in Bioethics at Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics where he studied bioethical issues in global healthcare delivery; role of bioethicists in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and other evolving technologies; and, emotional intelligence in bioethical analysis. He is a New Voices Fellow at The Aspen Institute, Washington, D.C., and a Fellow at Harvard Graduate School Leadership Institute, Boston.
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Podcast: The Friday Five Weekly Roundup in Health Research

In this week's Friday Five, a new face mask can detect Covid and send an alert to your phone. Plus, promising research for a breakthrough drug to treat schizophrenia, an AI tool that can create new proteins, progress on a longevity drug - and more.

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The Friday Five covers five stories in research that you may have missed this week. There are plenty of controversies and troubling ethical issues in science – and we get into many of them in our online magazine – but this news roundup focuses on scientific creativity and progress to give you a therapeutic dose of inspiration headed into the weekend.

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Matt Fuchs

Matt Fuchs is the editor-in-chief of Leaps.org. He is also a contributing reporter to the Washington Post and has written for the New York Times, Time Magazine, WIRED and the Washington Post Magazine, among other outlets. Follow him on Twitter @fuchswriter.

​Life is Emerging: Review of Siddhartha Mukherjee’s Song of the Cell

A new book by Pulitzer-winning physician-scientist Siddhartha Mukherjee will be released from Simon & Schuster on October 25, 2022.

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The DNA double helix is often the image spiraling at the center of 21st century advances in biomedicine and the growing bioeconomy. And yet, DNA is molecularly inert. DNA, the code for genes, is not alive and is not strictly necessary for life. Ought life be at the center of our communication of living systems? Is not the Cell a superior symbol of life and our manipulation of living systems?

A code for life isn’t a code without the life that instantiates it. A code for life must be translated. The cell is the basic unit of that translation. The cell is the minimal viable package of life as we know it. Therefore, cell biology is at the center of biomedicine’s greatest transformations, suggests Pulitzer-winning physician-scientist Siddhartha Mukherjee in his latest book, The Song of the Cell: The Exploration of Medicine and the New Human.

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Lee Cooper
Lee Cooper is a biotech investor and entrepreneur, and teaches bio-innovation on the faculty of Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering. He aims to support human-centered innovations built on an understanding of the ways that culture and technology shape one another.